Essig Museum of Entomology

Essig Museum of Entomology

The Essig Museum of Entomology is a world-class terrestrial arthropod collection with a historical focus on surveying the insect fauna of California. Today that focus has broadened to include the eastern Pacific Rim and the islands of the Pacific Basin. The Essig Museum also maintains vast collections of specimens from local, regional, and national parks from past and current projects related to biodiversity surveys, biogeography and systematics, and ecosystem services.


Museum of Vertebrate Zoology

MVZ

The Museum of Vertebrate Zoology (MVZ) at the University of California, Berkeley, is a center for research and education in the biology of amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. Founded in 1908, the Museum's mission is to document and increase understanding of the diversity of terrestrial vertebrates, with particular emphasis on western North America. The superb collections are at the heart of the MVZ program, where methods of field biology are combined with modern laboratory techniques and analytical methods in a comprehensive, synthetic approach. Our goals are to remain at the forefront of international research on evolutionary biology from the perspectives of systematics, ecology, behavior, functional and developmental morphology, population biology, and evolutionary genomics, and to lead the way in developing and using major natural history collections for research, education, and solving problems in biodiversity conservation.


UC Museum of Paleontology

UCMP

The mission of the University of California Museum of Paleontology (UCMP) is to investigate and promote the understanding of the history of life and the diversity of the Earth's biota through research and education. Founded as a repository in 1921 to assure the long-term maintenance of collections, current holdings comprise over 5 million specimens from more than 90,000 localities worldwide, distributed across all continents and more than 500 million years of Earth history. Additionally, UCMP serves as a repository for federal collections held in the public trust for the National Parks, Bureau of Land Management, Forest Service, and Bureau of Reclamation. More than 230 National Park areas preserve fossils, something we celebrate annually in October during National Fossil Day, and through interactive maps provided on The Paleontology Portal website. We serve national and international audiences through the use of our collections by researchers throughout the world and the worldwide reach of our websites, (Understanding Evolution and Understanding Science) now translated into multiple languages and averaging over 2.7 million page accesses each month.


William Clemens

William Clemens
University of California, Museum of Paleontology
Curator, Professor Emeritus

Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Reserve, Montana

William's research studies the paleontology and geology of the Hell Creek and Tullock Formations.


Erica Clites

Erica Clites
University of California Museum of Paleontology
Museum Scientist

Golden Gate National Recreation Area, Point Reyes National Seashore, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, Grand Canyon National Park, Zion National Park, Fort Washington Park, Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park, Manassas National Battlefield Park

Erica designs long-term field monitoring protocols for fossil sites in cooperation with park staff. In addition, she writes, edits and updates paleontological resource reports, including field checking fossil sites against what is reported in the literature.


Talisin Hammond

Talisin Hammond
Museum of Vertebrate Zoology
Graduate Student

Yosemite National Park

Talisin researches how stress physiology affects a species' response to climate change. Her work focuses on chipmunks in Yosemite National Park at different elevations.


Dale McCullough

Dale McCullough
College of Natural Resources: Environmental Science, Policy and Management; Museum of Vertebrate Zoology
Emeritus Professor of Wildlife Biology, Research Conservationist

Yellowstone; Glacier; Sequoia-Kings; Olympic; Noatak (AK); Angel Island State; Shiretoko (Japan); Land of the Leopard (Far East Russia); Kenting; Yushan; and Yangmingshan (Taiwan); Yathong Nature Reserve (Australia); Wolong Nature Reserve (China).

Dale's work in parks includes wildlife conservation and management. As a professor of wildlife he has participated in research in many parks by himself and with graduate students. He is involved in the review of controversies such as National Academy of Sciences Committee reviews of Grizzly Bears in Yellowstone, Brucellosis in bison and elk in Yellowstone, Northern Range Ungulates in Yellowstone, Horses and Burros (in Death Valley and others), and many others. Dale is coauthor of the book "Wildlife policies in the U.S. National Parks", as well as Adviser on management of national parks in Japan and Taiwan, lead editor on the book, "Wildlife in Shiretoko and Yellowstone National Parks", and was the major figure on the deer controversy on Angel Island, and other activities. Although retired since 2004 he continues his research and consulting, mainly in Japan, Taiwan, Australia, and Far East Russia where he studies Amur leopards (most endangered large cat in the world, about 30 left), and Siberian tigers.


Jimmy McGuire

Jimmy McGuire
Museum of Vertebrate Zoology and College of Letters and Science: Integrative Biology
Curator of Herpetology and Associate Professor

Yosemite National Park Lassen Volcanic National Park Death Valley National Park Numerous national parks and reserved in Indonesia including Bantimurung National Park, Bogani Nani Wartabone National Park, Lore Lindu National Park, Gunung Rinjani National Park, Laiwani Wanggamete National Park, Tangkoko Nature Reserve, and Rimbo Panti Nature Reserve

Jimmy assisted in the sampling of reptiles and amphibians for the Grinnell Centennial Project in Yosemite and Lassen national parks. He visits Death Valley National Park every other spring on a 4-day course field trip. His fieldwork in parks and nature reserves of Indonesia are tied to ongoing biodiversity discovery and comparative biogeographical investigations.


Michael Nachman

Michael Nachman
College of Letters & Science: Integrative Biology and Museum of Vertebrate Zoology
Professor

Cabeza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge

Michael's lab has done field work at Cabeza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge in southern Arizona on the genetic basis of adaptive color variation in rock pocket mice. This has mainly involved collecting specimens.


Peter Oboyski

Peter Oboyski
Essig Museum of Entomology
Collections Manager and Senior Museum Scientist

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park; Haleakala National Park; Golden Gate National Recreation Area; California State Parks; (California) East Bay Regional Parks; French Polynesia parks and conservation lands

Peter's research interests include the biogeography, systematics, and evolution of Lepidoptera on remote oceanic islands, in particular the Hawaiian Islands and French Polynesia. He is also interested in trophic relationships including insect-plant and host-parasitoid interactions.


James Patton

James L. Patton
College of Letters & Sciences, Integrative Biology and Museum of Vertebrate Zoology
Professor Emeritus and Curator of Mammals

Yosemite National Park, Lassen-Volcanic National Park, Sequoia-Kings Canyon National Parks, Death Valley National Park, Mohave Preserve, Carrizo Plains National Monument

James led the small mammal Grinnell resurvey teams for Yosemite National Park and was a major participant in those resurveys for both Lassen-Volcanic and Sequoia-Kings Canyon. He has worked extensively in past decades throughout Death Valley and what is now the Mojave Preserve as well as in the Carrizo and Elkhorn Plains. He will lead the mammal resurvey team in the forthcoming extension of the Grinnell Resurvey Project in Death Valley, Mojave Preserve, and Joshua Tree.