Faculty

Steve Beissinger

Steve Beissinger
College of Natural Resources: Environmental Science, Policy, and Management
Professor of Conservation Biology

Yosemite National Park, Sequoia-Kings Canyon National Park, Lassen Volcanic National Park, Death Valley National Park, Joshua Tree National Park, Big Basin State Park, Everglades National Park, Spenceville State Wildlife Area.

Our work examines the effects of climate change on California's birds and mammals as part of the Grinnell Resurvey Project, and on ways to recover Endangered Species that reside in parks, such as the Devils Hole Pupfish, Marbled Murrelet, and Black Rail. The Grinnell Resurvey work retraces the footsteps of Berkeley scientists who surveyed birds and mammals throughout California to examine how species have responded to changing temperature and precipitation. For more information on this project, click here.


Justin Brashares

Justin Brashares
​College of Natural Resources: Environmental Science, Policy and Management
Associate Professor

Yosemite National Park, Yellowstone National Park, Carrizo Plain National Monument, Banff National Park, Serengeti National Park, Ruaha National Park, Mole National Park, Makira National Park.

Justin's research about parks addresses questions relating to:
- Impact of human activities (hunting, recreation, roads, land-use) and climate change on park biodiversity.
- Human demography around protected areas throughout the world and impacts of changes in demography on parks.
- History of parks and formulation of policy to manage parks in times of great global change.
- Population trends of wildlife in parks and correlates of species declines.
- Community ecology of wildlife in parks.
- Human livelihoods, health and poverty at protected area edges.

Justin also led a meta-analysis of conservation effectiveness of 308 parks in Africa and Latin America and wrote a review on wildlife declines in National Parks. Both appeared in the journal Science.


Thomas BrunsThomas Bruns
College of Natural Resources: Plant and Microbial Biology
Professor

Pt Reyes National Seashore, Yosemite National Park, Channel Islands National Park.

Thomas' work includes basic research on ectomycorrhizal fungal community structure, which has been funded through several NSF grants. He also conducts surveys of the macrofungi present in the parks which has been done in conjunction with citizen scientists from local mycological societies.


Kristina Hill

Kristina Hill
College of Environmental Design: Landscape Architecture & Environmental Planning
Associate Professor

Crissy Field, San Francisco (Golden Gate National Recreation Area), Klondike Gold Rush National Park, Alaska Gateway National Park, Brooklyn NYC, Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area, Anacostia Park, Bronx River Greenway Park, Golden Gate Park, Myrtle Edwards Park, (Seattle, WA), Ravenna Park (Seattle, WA), Back Bay Fens, (Boston, MA), National Parks in Stockholm, Sweden, Local parks in London, Local parks in Hamburg, Germany, National and local coastal parks in Ireland

Krstina works in the area of ecologically-based design for parks and urban districts. Her research identifies multi-functional opportunities in park design that can support stormwater management, biodiversity, social justice, and human health. In the last 8 years, Kristina has specialized in the analysis and design of parks and public spaces that help coastal cities adapt to climate change.


Rosemary Joyce

Rosemary Joyce
College of Letters & Science: Anthropology
Professor

Parque Eco-Arqueologico Los Naranjos, Honduras Parque Arqueologico Curruste, Honduras Parque Arqueologico Cerro Palenque, Honduras (under development)

As an archaeologist, Rosemary conducted non-invasive subsurface prospection and excavation to identify the village settlement of people who constructed a 10 meter tall pyramid ca. 800 BC at the northwest end of Lake Yojoa, Honduras. This is the cultural resource around which the Parque Los Naranjos was developed; the park also showcases the plant, animal, and especially bird species preserved in this location. Rosemary's research is designed to be incorporated in on-site interpretive programs, and as part of her work she conducted docent training for park guides. For the other two archaeological parks, she provided educational training to site stewards and local community members. The Curruste park was formally opened; the Cerro Palenque park is officially delimited, and the community maintains stewardship, but opening for the general public has not taken place.


Gregory Levine

Gregory Levine
College of Letters & Science: History of Art
Associate Professor

Muir Woods National Monument, Manzanar National Historic Site

Gregory's work includes research on visual cultures related to Buddhism. Specifically, in Muir Woods he conducted a study of the site/history of a statue of a Buddha made in 1892 by the SF Bohemian Club. In Manzanar, he has studied a Buddhist sculpture made by an individual incarcerated in the concentration camp.


David Vogel

David Vogel
Haas School of Business and College of Letters & Science: Political Science
Professor

David is currently researching and writing a history of environmental policy in California that includes material on local, state and national parks in California.

 


Richard Walker

Richard Walker
College of Letters & Science: Geography
Professor Emeritus

Parks in the San Francisco Bay Area

Richard's book, The Country in the City: The Greening of the San Francisco Bay Area is the definitive history of environmentalism/conservation in the Bay Area, and it deals with park acquisition, park defense, and other such matters of the politics and political culture of the local green movement. His ongoing project, The Living New Deal, is a national survey of all New Deal public works built between 1933 and 1942.


David Ackerly

David Ackerly
College of Letters and Science: Integrative Biology
Professor

Black Diamond Mines Regional Preserve; Mt. Diablo State Park; Mather Regional Park (Sacramento County); Lacandon Biosphere Reserve (Mexico)

David's research focuses on climate change impacts on plants and implications for conservation strategies and protection of open space, with a focus on the San Francisco Bay Area.


Roger Bales

Roger Bales
College of Engineering: Civil & Environmental Engineering
Adjunct Professor and Co-Director of the CITRIS Intelligent Water Infrastructures Initiative
 

Yosemite, Sequoia, Kings Canyon, Northeast Greenland National Park.

Roger's research focuses on hydrology, climate and glaciology.


Reginald_Barrett

Reginald Barrett
​College of Natural Resources: Environmental Science, Policy and Management
Professor Emeritus

East Bay Regional Parks, Annadel State Park, Point Reyes National Seashore, Yosemite National Park, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Lassen National Park.

Reginald's research focuses on specific wildlife species' ecology and management issues.


John Battles

John Battles
​College of Natural Resources: Environmental Science, Policy, and Management
Professor of Forest Ecology

Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area, Sequoia Kings Canyon National Parks, Point Reyes National Seashore, Golden Gate National Recreation Area, Yosemite National Park, Mailliard Redwoods State Natural Reserve (CA), Adirondack State Park (NY).

John studies forest dynamics and tree demography. The goal of his research is to know how and why forests change.


Eric Biber

Eric Biber
Berkeley Law
Professor of Law

Eric conducts research on public land management. In particular he focuses on:

  • the role of courts and private actors in supervising public land management through litigation;
  • the nature and quality monitoring of environmental conditions on public lands and how to better structure public land management agencies to ensure higher quality monitoring;
  • how to structure legal and regulatory systems to ensure effective adaptation by public land managers to climate change; and
  • the legal structure of the Wilderness Act in constraining or facilitating adaptation to climate change.

Greg Biging

Greg Biging
College of Natural Resources: Environmental Science, Policy and Management
Professor

Northern California East Bay Regional Parks (Tilden, Wildcat, Redwood, Sibley, Huckleberry, Roberts)


Greg's work includes: field sampling, and mapping sudden oak death with remote sensing and GIS in the East Bay Regional Parks. His team has also created models to predict the disease progression on the landscape and to identify areas of high mortality.
 


Roger Byrne

Roger Byrne
College of Letters & Science: Geography

Associate Professor

Banff National Park, Canada

Roger's research includes Paleoecology, Fire History and Climate Change.


Galen Cranz

Galen Cranz
College of Environmental Design: Architecture
Professor of Architecture

Crissy Field in Golden Gate National Park, Shah Alam Park in Selangor, Malaysia.

Galen analyzes the social goals of American urban parks, who promoted them, who was intended to benefit, who benefited in practice, what happened to the model in practice, and its transformation over time to the next idealized model. Galen has identified four major ideal models, and in 2004 she published "defining the sustainable Park" which is the new fifth model. Recently she has considered the role of libraries in urban parks. She has also authored a literature review of parks throughout the United States regarding sustainability.


Neil Davies

Neil Davies
Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research: Richard B. Gump South Pacific Research Station, Moorea
Executive Director

Moorea Lagoon

Neil's research includes biodiversity inventories (e.g. Moorea Biocode Project), climate change assessments, carbon budget, social science, terrestrial ecology, oceanography and marine ecology, ecoinformatics, biodiversity genomics, ecosystem modeling, coupled natural-human systems research, and studies of a network of reserves within the Moorea marine protected area.


Todd Dawson

Todd Dawson
College of Letters & Science: Integrative Biology; College of Natural Resources: Environmental Science, Policy and Management
Professor

Redwood National Park, Sequoia/Kings Canyon National Park, Humboldt Redwood State Park, Samuel P. Taylor State Park, Big Basin State Park, Prairie Creek State Park, Jed Smith State Park, Table Mountain National Park, South Africa Monteverde National Park, Costa Rica.

Todd's research includes: Forest Ecosystem, Biogeochemistry, Tree Physiology, Ecohydrology, Climate and Land-use Change.


Ian Duncan

Ian Duncan
College of Letters & Science: English
Professor

 

Yellowstone National Park

Ian is the editor of Arthur Conan Doyle's novel "The Lost World" (1912) for Oxford University Press. At a paper at a recent conference at King's College, London (Dec. 2013) he argued that Yellowstone is a prototype for Doyle's (Amazonian) Lost World, and that the story is conditioned by a rising discourse of species extinction and protected spaces where prehistoric ecosystems can be preserved, as much (or more than) for entertainment and tourism as for scientific purposes.


Seth Finnegan

Seth Finnegan
​College of Letters and Science: Integrative Biology
Assistant Professor

Death Valley National Park

Seth led a student field trip to examine Precambrian and Paleozoic rocks that record evidence of some of the earliest animal life and some of the first mass extinctions in the marine fossil record.


Wayne Getz

Wayne Getz
​College of Natural Resources: Environmental Science, Policy and Management
Professor

Yellowstone National Park, Etosha National Park in Namibia, Kruger National Park in South Africa, Tembe Elephant Park in KwaZulu South Africa, Samburu Game Park in Kenya.

Wayne's research includes the introduction of wolves into Yellowstone; elephant behavior and movements in Samburu, buffalo movement and spread of bovine TB in Kruger; zebra, springbok, elephant, vulture, jackal, lion and hyena movement in Etosha and outbreaks of anthrax.


Rosemary Gillespie

Rosemary Gillespie
​College of Natural Resources: Environmental Science, Policy and Management
Professor

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Haleakala National Park, Kokee State Park, Natural Area Reserves System Hawaii.

Islands have provided an arena for building and testing some of the fundamentals of ecology and evolution. However, reconciling concepts such as equilibrium through immigration and extinction, with models of evolution and adaptive radiation, has proved elusive. Recent advances have been made in the understanding of biodiversity through ecological theories (Neutral, Maximum Information Entropy, Food Web). Parallel developments have been made in evolutionary theories designed to understand common metrics of diversification. In Rosemary's research, she will draw on these disparate theoretical frameworks and, using an island system, show how they might be merged to understand the interplay between ecological and evolutionary factors in generating biodiversity. In terms of conservation relevance, Rosemary's research will provide answers to the following: How important is priority, sequence, abundance, and interaction strengths in determining response to higher rates of immigration from non-native taxa? Can non-native species substitute functionally for natives? How important is the microbial community? And can we develop viable strategies for restoration?


Nelson Graburn

Nelson Graburn
College of Letters & Science: Anthropology
Professor Emeritus

Auyuittuk (Baffin Island), Pingualuit (Nunavik, PQ), various parks in China and Japan, UNESCO GeoParks system.

Nelson is interested in tourism and heritage preservation, especially in relationship to indigenous peoples and their traditional rights, practices and the problems of commercialization of parks with original inhabitants.


Allan Jacobs

Allan Jacobs
College of Environmental Design: City and Regional Planning
Professor Emeritus

Various San Francisco city parks

Allan's research and scholarly work has been on the practice of city planning and urban design, on what can be learned about cities from observation, on streets and on boulevards. All of this research has led to published books.

With Professor Elizabeth Macdonald, Allan conceived and made possible the Patricia's Green park in San Francisco at the end of Octavia Boulevard, which they also designed. As San Francisco's planning director in the 1970s he made possible the City's mini park program (some 24 small parks) as well as a noted small park on 24th Street, near Potrero Avenue. The Octavia Boulevard and Patricia's Green project grew out of Allan's research at Berkeley that led to his book Great Streets and from the research on multi-way boulevards.


Daniel Kammen

Daniel Kammen
​College of Natural Resources: Energy and Resources Group
Professor

State and National Parks across the Western U. S.

Daniel's research group analyzes the emissions from power plants and the regional burden across the West, including national parks. His work includes biomass management and off-takes from park and federal lands for biofuels; air basin impacts in parks from power plants; and water use for energy and impacts on wild-lands.


Eileen Lacey

Eileen Lacey
College of Letters and Sciences: Integrative Biology & Museum of Vertebrate Zoology
Associate Professor

Yosemite National Park; Parque Nacional Nahuel Huapi (Argentina); Monumento Natural Laguna los Pozuelos (Argentina); Reserva Aymara Lupaca (Peru); Parque Nacional Fray Jorge (Chile); Parque Natural Karukinka (Chile); Santuario Natural Yerba Loca (Chile)

Most of Eileen's research occurs in national parks and reserves in South America, where she is studying the evolution of behavioral diversity in rodents. Specifically, she is using phylogenetically-informed, comparative studies tuco-tucos (genus Ctenomys) and their close relatives to examine the causes and consequences of living alone versus within a group of conspecifics. Closer to home, since 2009 members of her lab have been working in Yosemite National Park to identify the behavioral, ecological, and physiology reasons for the striking differences in response to environmental change evident among the chipmunks species that occur in the Sierra Nevada of California. This work is part of the “second generation” of the MVZ’s Grinnell Resurvey Project, which is examining patterns and processes of change in the fauna of California over the past century.


Kent Lightfoot

Kent Lightfoot
College of Letters & Science: Anthropology
Professor

Pinnacles National Park, Ano Nuevo State Park, Fort Ross State Historic Park, Sonoma State Historic Park.

Kent's research focuses on archaeology, both pre-colonial and colonial periods.


Margaretta Lovell

Margaretta Lovell
College of Letters & Science: History of Art
Professor

Yosemite National Park

Margaretta teaches a course that uses Yosemite for field work. She takes students to Yosemite and sends them out in teams to discover the sites of nineteenth-century paintings of the valley and to analyze the aesthetic process of the artist as well as the ecological shifts in the landscape over the last century.


Waverly Lowell

Waverly Lowell
College of Environmental Design: Environmental Design Archives
Archivist

Environmental Design Archives is committed to raising awareness of the built and landscaped environment through collecting, preserving and providing access to the records of Northern California architects, landscape architects, and architectural photographers, in addition to some national and international landscape architects.

 


Michael Manga

Michael Manga
College of Letters & Science: Earth & Planetary Science
Professor
 

Lassen NP, Yellowstone NP, Alum Rock (San Jose city park)

Michael's research includes volcanoes, geysers and how earthquakes affect fluids flow in the crust.


Joe McBride

Joe McBride
College of Environmental Design: Landscape Architecture and College of Natural Resources: Environmental Science, Policy and Management
Professor Emeritus

GGNRA (National Park Service), Mt. Tamalpias State Park, Tilden Park (East Bay Regional Park District), Austin Creek State Recreational Area, Lands End (Golden Gate Park Conservancy) Richardson Grove State Park.

Joe's research includes studies of the ecology of vegetation in parks. He also works on preparing vegetation management plans for parks.


Adina Merenlender

Adina Merenlender
​College of Natural Resources: Environmental Science, Policy, and Management
Cooperative Extension Specialist, Adjunct Professor

Research in Regional and State parks in Sonoma County. Environmental outreach and education for regional, State, and National Parks throughout California.

Adina developed the UC California Naturalist Program. Launched in 2012 through the University of California Cooperative Extension, the UC California Naturalist Program is designed to introduce the public, natural resource managers, teachers, interpreters, docents, green collar workers, and budding scientists to the wonders of our unique ecology and engage these individuals in the stewardship of California's natural communities. The California Naturalist Program uses a science curriculum, experiential learning, and service to instill a deep appreciation for the natural communities of the state and to engage people in natural resource conservation. The program is currently partnering with 21 organizations, and five times as many have expressed interest in participating, including land conservancies, regional, state, and federal parks to provide environmental science learning and stewardship training opportunities across the state. In two years, the California Naturalist Program has trained over 600 adults who have in turn volunteered over 11,000 hours of service, many to local, state, and federal parks. As far as research, Adina's lab published some of the first research papers on the impacts of quiet recreation on biodiversity conservation and continues to study recreation impacts on regional and state parks that make up the San Diego NCCP. She speaks regularly to park managers about ways to better balance recreation and biodiversity conservation.


Max Moritz

Max Moritz
​College of Natural Resources: Environmental Science, Policy and Management
Cooperative Extension Specialist

Point Reyes National Seashore, Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area, Sequoia/Kings Canyon National Park, and the network of Federal protected areas

Max's research and extension programs focus on fire ecology and management, emphasizing spatial analysis of fire regimes at relatively broad scales and applying scientific findings to ecosystem management. His interests range from understanding the basic controls on fire dynamics to climate change adaptation and conservation planning efforts.


Patrick O'Grady

Patrick O'Grady
​College of Natural Resources: Environmental Science, Policy, and Management
Assistant Professor

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Haleakala National Park, Kokee State Park.

Patrick studies how biological diversity forms and is maintained in natural systems. His research focuses on the Hawaiian Drosophila, a group of over 1000 species of flies, all of which are found only in Hawaii.


Kevin O'Hara

Kevin O'Hara
​College of Natural Resources: Environmental Science, Policy, and Management
Professor

Redwood National and State Parks, Montgomery Woods State Park, Del Norte Coast Redwoods State Park, Big Basin State Park, Marin Municipal Watershed.

Kevin's research includes ecology and management of redwood forests.


Jerry Powell

Jerry Powell
College of Natural Resources: Environmental Science, Policy and Management
Director Emeritus

Pt. Reyes National Seashore, California Channel Islands National Park, Great Smokey Mountains National Park, Mt. Diablo State Park, Torrey Pines State Park, Balboa Park (San Diego), Santa Catalina Island (Catalina Conservancy), University of California Natural Land Reserves (Hastings Reserve, Upper Carmel Valley and Big Creek Reserve, Monterey Co.)

The principal theme of Jerry's research has been to discover and correlate biological features with traditional morphological evidence in the development of biosystematic relationships of microlepidoptera (small moths). His approach can be categorized along four lines: 1) systematics studies of particular taxa; 2) comparative biology oriented along hostplant or ecological roles (e.g., yucca moths, fungus feeders, borers of woody composites, leaf miners, sand dune associates); 3) a broad spectrum larval rearing program; and 4) faunal inventory.


Jean-Pierre Protzen

Jean-Pierre Protzen
​College of Environmental Design: Landscape Architecture
Professor Emeritus

Machu Picchu, Ollantaytambo, Tambo Colorado and Pachacamac in Peru and Tiwanaku in Bolivia.

Jean-Pierre's research is concerned with the design and preservation of the architecture and landscape of the pre-Columbian Andean civilization.


Vincent Resh

Vincent Resh
​College of Natural Resources: Environmental Science, Policy, and Management
Professor

Yellowstone National Park, Glacier National Park, Samuel P. Taylor State Park, East Bay Regional Park (Tilden)

Vincent's research includes stream and river ecology and monitoring and detection of pollutants.


Andy Shanken

Andy Shanken
College of Environmental Design: Architecture
Associate Professor

 

 

Andy's research looks at the staging and curation of parks, and the theming of wilderness.

 


Whendee Silver

Whendee Silver
College of Natural Resources: Environmental Science, Policy, and Management
Professor

El Yunque National Forest, Point Reyes National Sea Shore, Golden Gate National Recreation Area.

Whendee's research focuses on the role of ecosystems in greenhouse gas emissions and climate change mitigation. Her research in parks and related lands spans both basic and applied science. In Point Reyes she has determined the controls on nitrous oxide production and consumption, and explored the role of plant biodiversity in the fate of nitrogen pollution. In the GGNRA and Point Reyes, she is studying the potential for grassland management to sequester atmospheric CO2 and slow climate change. In the El Yunque National Forest, she is determining the controls on carbon storage and greenhouse gas emissions in tropical forests.


Nicholas Sitar

Nicholas Sitar
College of Engineering: Civil and Environmental Engineering
Edward G. Cahill and John R. Cahill Professor of Civil Engineering

Yosemite National Park

Nicholas' research focuses on rock fall and rock slide hazard identification, monitoring, and prediction.


Chelsea Specht

Chelsea Specht
College of Natural Resources: Plant and Molecular Biology and College of Letters & Science: Integrative Biology
Assistant Professor

Bolivia National Parks (Pilon Lajas, Noel Kempff Mercado, Manuripi Heath, Amboro), Gabon National Parks (Crystal Mountains, Moukalaba-Doudou, Akanda, Mayumba, Loango, Ivindo), Lassen National Park, Saguaro National Park, National Forests and Grasslands, UC Reserves (Granite Mountains, Angelo Coast, McLaughlin)

Chelsea collects plants that are native/endemic to the parks and surrounding areas and investigates genetics underlying adaptation to environmental and inter-species interactions.


Philip Stark

Philip Stark
College of Letters & Science: Statistics
Professor and Chair

Yosemite National Park

Philip's research is on the impact of pack stock use on the Yosemite Toad, a protected species, and the implications for managing land use in Yosemite Park.


Scott Stephens

Scott Stephens
College of Natural Resources: Environmental Science, Policy, and Management
Professor

Sierra de San Pedro Martir National Park (Mexico), Yosemite National Park, Sequoia-Kings Canyon National Park, Point Reyes National Park. China Camp State Park, Samuel P. Taylor State Park.

Scott works on fire dynamics and ecosystems. He has been working in Yosemite and Sequoia-Kings Canyon and the Sierra de San Pedro Martir National Park in Mexico for 15 years. In the U.S. National Parks his research includes quantifying the outcomes of the longest lightning ignited fire use programs in the U.S. and this work in informing the U.S. Forest Service in their management as well. In the Sierra de San Pedro Martir in Mexico, Scott's team has been working to understand fundamental disturbance processes in the last forest with a Mediterranean climate that has an intact fire regime (no fire suppression until 1970) and it has never been harvested. This is the last forest with these characteristics in the Northern Hemisphere or the world.


Claude Stoller

Claude Stoller
College of Environmental Design: Landscape Architecture
Professor

Claude's park related work includes a National Science joint project concerning industrial park design in Taiwan.

 


Sally Thompson

Sally Thompson
College of Engineering: Civil & Environmental Engineering
Assistant Professor

Yosemite National Park, Grant Park (Santa Clara)

Sally's research includes water quality & flow in response to different land use & management.


Ruth Tringham

Ruth Tringham
College of Letters & Science: Anthropology
Professor Emerita

Angel Island California State Park, San Francisco Presidio, Golden Gate National Recreation Area (Fort Point).

Ruth has worked on various projects in Angel Island State Park. She worked with WePlayers, a site-integrated theater company that performs in historic places. She also worked to develop a mobile app for visitors to Angel Island in collaboration with Angel Island Conservancy. She has taught summer school courses in San Francisco's Presidio that integrate cultural heritage digital documentation with research on Presidio history. She has served as a consultant for Presidio as Interpretive Park as well as on a joint program (between UC Berkeley and San Francisco Presidio) of outreach involving elementary and middle schools in the San Francisco Bay Area.


Khatharya Um

Khatharya Um
College of Letters & Science: Ethnic Studies
Associate Professor & Chair

Peralta Hacienda Historical Park

Khatharya's research includes work with the Peralta Hacienda Historical Park on an exhibit about Cambodian refugees in Northern California as well as with Mien urban gardeners in Oakland. She is a scholar advisor for the Stockton Cambodian oral History project. She is also on the advisory panel for the Asian American and Pacific Islander American Theme Study for the National Park Services.


Tim White

Tim White
​College of Letters and Science: Integrative Biology and Human Evolution Research Center
Professor, Director of Human Evolution Research Center

Yangudi Rassa National Park, Ethiopia

Tim's primary interests involve human evolution in all its dimensions. His research emphasizes fieldwork designed to acquire new data on early hominid skeletal biology, environmental context, and behavior. He has worked on hominids spanning the Pliocene and Pleistocene, from phylogenetic and functional perspectives. In parallel with this research, but in a more behavioral realm, he has investigated bone modification in the Pleistocene of the Old World and in the Holocene Southwest United States.


Jennifer Wolch

Jennifer Wolch
College of Environmental Design: City & Regional Planning
Dean; Professor

Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area Parks

Jennifer's work includes park access & environmental justice. Her most recent work analyzes connections between city form, physical activity, and public health, and develops strategies to address environmental justice issues by improving access to urban parks and recreational resources.